The Berlin Wall Memorial and Museum

The Berlin wall was the key point for coming here, along with hearing how progressive the city was for foodies, especially vegans. We were not disappointed with either.

First the Berlin wall.  I was living in Hugelsheim, Germany when the wall came down.  I never did make it to Berlin before the wall came down or just after.  I do remember how the big thing was to have a piece of the wall.

Fast forward a few decades, and how the wall has been preserved is extremely well done.

It was a cool overcast day when we walked to the Berlin Wall Memorial.  It is a combination of outside displays and inside ones. At first you see billboard size photos of the time period of the wall and the building of it, in chronological order.

Photos of the area on different years

Photos of the area on different years

Start of Memorial with pictures

Start of Memorial with pictures

 

Along with all the pictures are descriptions describing what happened.  There are pathways on the ground denoting tunnels that were built to the west.  At this point the eastern side of the wall is the buildings with the photos on the side and on the west side is the rebar that was in the wall.

Rebar showing where the wall was on the western side.

Rebar showing where the wall was on the western side.

One of many pathways denoting where a tunnel was.

One of many pathways denoting where a tunnel was.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a walking tour. We may have started at the end but I do not really think it mattered either way.  As you walk towards the west, there are more pictures and descriptions and of course more pathways showing where they found tunnels.  Some of the tunnels were discovered and some were not.

Reconciliation sculpture by Josefina de Vasconcellos. Copies exist at Hiroshima peace museum and Coventry Cathedral

Reconciliation sculpture by Josefina de Vasconcellos. Copies exist at Hiroshima peace museum and Coventry Cathedral

 

As we carry on walking, following the memorial, which by the way, is very interactive for all ages, we end up at a preserved section of the wall.  You climb up to the top of the Berlin Wall Museum and can then see over into the section.

A section of the Berlin Wall with guard tower and no man's land.

A section of the Berlin Wall with guard tower and no man’s land.

 

You get to see both sides of the wall with the guard tower and the “no man’s land” between the two walls.

Berlin Wall section in the memorial

Berlin Wall section in the memorial

Walking a little farther on from the preserved section of the wall, you come to the actually memorial.  You are walking pass actually sections of the Berlin wall, and go into the “no man’s land” to see pictures of all the people – babies to elders – that died trying to escape the east to the west. The babies surprised Magpie.

It is at this place where you will find the sections that are heavily graffitied.

Berlin Wall section preserved that was covered with graffitti

Berlin Wall section preserved that was covered with graffiti

 

At this point we were hungry and looking for washrooms, so we did not go through the museum.

Since the wall is now completely down and as a reminder of where the wall was – since it was NOT a straight division – there is a line through the road/sidewalk that is a different brick to indicate the path.  The path is not a logical path, to me anyways.

Finding a washroom was easy; there is a small cafe behind the Berlin Wall Museum where you can find a washroom.  There food is strictly coffee, juice and pastries – not our food.

Walking back the way we came we found a trailer size store that was a turkish restaurant with falafels.  That was our kind of food.  It was good and inexpensive.

Overall, we were very impressed with the Berlin Wall Memorial. It was great for Magpie and getting a really good look at our history.

 

2 thoughts on “The Berlin Wall Memorial and Museum

  1. Wow! My school had three large pieces of the Berlin Wall donated. I visited them for the first time at night, when no one else was around, and I could marvel at them in silence. I went up and laid my hand on the concrete, thinking about how many other people had touched this, people who wanted to get to the other side, people who prepared it’s shipment across the world to California. Great post – thank you!

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